Making Bullets More Imaginative

As an e-learning designer, I see more bullets than most police officers do in a lifetime. So much of our work involves taking old bullet-heavy power point presentations and transforming them into fun, vibrant e-learning courses.

Click to view sample

Click to view sample

One problem with bulleted lists (especially the wordy and long ones) is that it can be overwhelming for the learner to have to read the bullets and pay attention to the narration at the same time. If you’ve ever tried to read a newspaper article while someone is talking to you, you’ll know what I mean.

My usual approach is to replace the bullets altogether with pictures, especially if the narrator is already saying the same thing as the bullets. When you use pictures this way, you want the pictures to reinforce (and not distract from) what is being said by the narrator.

But sometimes the client really wants to see those bulleted lists up there. So, I came up with this hybrid of images and text. The samples below were from three different courses, one each on water, energy, and school site investigations. Just click on the pictures to launch them.

Here’s one about water:

Click to view sample.

Click to view sample.

Here’s one about doing an investigation, thus the magnifying glass:

Breathing life into bullets

Click to view sample.

Here’s one about energy:

Click to view sample

Click to view sample

I hope you enjoyed these. Let me know what you think!

Let Me Try – Creating Interactive Software Simulations

Most people will remember something they’ve actually done more readily than something they were just shown how to do. With programs like Storyline it’s possible to create
e-learning modules that offer the learner the opportunity to practice what they’ve learned. To demonstrate how this might work, I created a short sample module of how to use the Player in Pinnacle’s Studio 17 video editing program.

View of Entire Interface

View of Entire Interface

I started by giving the learner a view of the entire UI, then zoomed in on the Player itself.

Bubble appears with description of button

Bubble appears with description of button

By simply using hotspots, triggers and layers in Storyline, I created a second slide where learners could click on each of the controls of the player for a description of what they do. Then it was time for the learner to get their hands dirty and try out the controls themselves.

It’s just a simulation Jim!
Because this was just a simulation and not the actual program, I needed to be sure learners could only click one button at a time following my instructions. Otherwise, there would be no way to predict where in the video they would be when they hit the rewind button for example, unless you knew where they’d left off.

To accomplish this, I created individual images of all the player control buttons and used Storyline’s “Hidden” state to hide them when I didn’t want learners to click them. Underneath all those images, I still had a picture of the entire player including the controls, so learners would still see them – even when the “clickable” images of them (on top of the picture of the player) were hidden.

Trigger Happy?
I created the following Triggers for each of the clickable images of the control buttons:

  1. A trigger to either play a video or change the state of a picture (a still shot of where the video would be) from Hidden to Normal. I should mention here that I had to set the “initial state” of all the still shots to Hidden, so learners would not see them until they clicked the button with the trigger.
  2. A trigger to play the audio clip with the instructions on which button to click next.
  3. A trigger to change the state of that button from Hidden to Normal.
  4. A trigger to change the state of the button they just clicked from Normal to Hidden – remember, I don’t want users to be able to click any other buttons because I need to control the order in which they click them to make the simulation work properly.
  5. In one instance I had to set a trigger to take learners to the next slide. I only did this once, because I had a second video showing the looping effect and thought I might be pushing my luck placing a second video on top of the first one on the same slide with all the other triggers and things going on. I guess I’d say that was a “judgment call”.

So, do you want to see the finished product? Just click here.

As always, if you need any clarification on how to do this, feel free to comment below and I’ll get back to you. I hope you enjoy creating your own software simulations. I also welcome you to check out David Anderson’s Weekly Challenge blog at E-Learning Heroes. It was because of his latest challenge that I created this simulation.