Allow Me to Introduce My Course

Have you ever taken an eLearning lesson and not understood how you’re supposed to interact with or navigate through it? Have you ever found yourself 15 minutes into a lesson or taken one of those online surveys, and start wondering how much longer it’s going to take? If you’re creating an eLearning lesson, I think it’s only considerate to let the learner know a few of these things upfront.

photo of multi coloured hot air balloons

Photo by Brett Sayles on Pexels.com

This week’s eLearning challenge was to create a gate screen. I think you’ll like this one. Check here to view it and let me know what you think!

Rubik’s Blues

I love watching science programs. I remember one show in particular was all about human perception and how we humans can be fooled by optical illusions. This week’s Articulate eLearning challenge was to create something using Pantone’s 2020 color of the year, “Classic Blue”.

RubiksBluesInteraction

I created this hotspot interaction around a Rubik’s Cube with different shades of the COTY. See if you can guess which of the three boxes is the lightest. It’s not as easy as you think!

 

 

 

 

Does Music Belong in eLearning?

I’ve never met anyone who said they hated music. Everyone at least likes music, but does it have a proper place in eLearning and if so, where and when should you use it? Certainly there are as many opinions on this topic as there are style preferences in what different people like to listen to. Since this is MY blog, I’ll tell you what I think and you can tell me what you think in the comments below.

MusicianBanjo.png

Because eLearning development tools like Articulate Storyline use separate slides or screens to place your content into, it doesn’t allow you to have uninterrupted background music playing throughout your module. This has never been a problem for me, as I don’t think music should run through the whole thing.

Introduction and Conclusion 

I like to include background music at the beginning and ending of each lesson. At the beginning, it sets the mood for the learner and when it returns at the conclusion, it indicates a sense of accomplishment and that things are wrapping up.

BackgroundMusicScenario

Scenarios and Quizzes

Most of the lessons I create have quizzes, and I like to include a little background music while the narrator explains how to take the quiz, what the passing score is, etc. Sometimes a client will also request a few branching scenarios where learners can practice what they’ve learned in a real-life situation. I’ll often use background music as the scenario is being introduced and again on the feedback slides to indicate if they made the right choices.

During Videos

Occasionally, a client will give me a video where there are bits of narration interspersed with periods of silence. I like to add a little background music if for no other reason than to tell the learner that the video is still running and to keep paying attention.

Watch the Volume!

Be careful not to overwhelm or distract the learner by having the volume on the background music too loud. You want the learner to be able to easily hear what the narrator is saying. As a rule of thumb, I tend to reduce the volume on the background music by 80%.

Before I finish, being the music geek that I am, did anyone catch what other music-related title I’m eluding to in the name of this post?

So Many Layers, So Little Time

Like an onion, too many layers can make an e-learning developer cry. You’re creating an e-learning lesson in Storyline and your client has a number of slides with multiple layers. Your client requires that the learner visit all of the layers on each slide before they can advance to the next.

Normally you’d disable the Next button in the Storyline player so that it won’t work until all the layers have been visited, or you have a customized Next or Continue button on the slide itself with an initial hidden state that switches to Normal after the learner has visited all the layers.

Layers1

Each red dot reveals a separate layer, that’s 10 layers!

True/False Variables
To accomplish this, you create a separate True/False variable for each layer and when the timeline begins on each layer, or when learners exit each layer, you have a trigger that switches each variable to True. Well, it’s easy to see that if you have a lot of layers and a lot of slides with layers, you could end up with 100+ variables to create. Fortunately, there is a much better way, and it works!

Number Variables
Instead of creating True/False variables for every layer, create 1 Number variable. Let’s say you have 10 layers, simply create a Number variable (I’d name it after the slide you’re on, but you can call it anything) with an initial value of 0.

Layers2

Why Greater Than or Equal To?
Then add a trigger on each layer to add 1 to the numbered variable you just created. And finally, on the base layer, add a trigger which says to change the Next button to normal when that variable is greater than or equal to 10.

In case the learner decides to visit one or more of the layers more than once before advancing to the next slide, it’s a good idea to use the “greater than or equal to” setting on the trigger. Also, if you try to set up this trigger, you’ll notice you don’t immediately have the option to set the value of the variable, you can only change it, uh oh!

Layers3

Not to worry, you just set the variable to change, then you Add + a Condition that says the variable is greater than or equal to 10 and you’re done.

Layers4

Click + and add a trigger condition

Disabling the Next Button
In case you don’t know how to do this, you can add a trigger on the base layer that says to disable the Next button at a certain point on the timeline. I usually set it to be disabled within the first second. You can do this by either entering the time (When Timeline Reaches) or adding a cue point to the timeline and setting the trigger to disable the Next button when it reaches the cue point.

Layers5

If you’re using a customized button, and not the one on the Storyline player, just set the initial state of the button to Hidden, and have it change to Normal after the variable has reached 10 or more (or whatever value you need based on the number of layers).

It’s also important to make sure all the triggers are in the correct order to work. In my lesson, I have the trigger to disable the Next button appear ABOVE the trigger to change it to Normal.

I hope I made this all very clear and easy to understand, but let me know in the comments if you have any questions.

 

Bert’s Sliders Returns

When David Anderson announced this week’s e-learning challenge would involve avatars, I thought this might be a good time for a sequel. We find ourselves back again at Bert’s Sliders. This time, instead of learning how to cook the perfect burger like we did in Part One, instead we’re going to concentrate on customer service issues.

3Avatars

In keeping with the challenge, the first thing the learner does is select their avatar, a character which will represent them throughout the interaction. Considering how I wanted the interaction to look, instead of using variables and triggers, I just used simple navigation triggers to move from one scene or slide to the next.

Some of you will know that the 3rd avatar is really Bert himself which I’m hoping does not cause confusion as Bert is supposed to be the proprietor of the restaurant and you are actually an employee working for him. But sometimes, I like to just run with the absurdity and let the cognitive dissonance remain. Maybe Bert has a split personality, or perhaps the learner is suffering from “delusions of grandeur”?

AvatarFeedback

So what we have hee-agh is your basic branching scenarios with three possible answers and feedback for each. Nutin’ fancy, but it’s fun. Let me know what you think. Click here to play.

Spring Cleaning in Winter

This last week, I’ve taken some time away from my project work to do a little spring cleaning of my WordPress site. Most of you reading this are elearning designers and developers, so you may have noticed that after you publish a file, if there’s a browser update, it can render your course/interaction inoperable. The sound or images might have gone out, or as often is the case, the whole thing won’t load.

OfficeGuy_Dusting.jpg

Here are a few things to keep in mind when republishing your elearning courses:

  1. Make sure the fonts look right. Many of the courses I had up on the site were created on a different computer and some of those fonts did not make their way onto the new one. In Articulate Storyline, when you click on the text, it will tell you which font name to look for. Even if the font doesn’t reside on your computer, it will tell you what font it used to be. This is true even though Storyline has actually replaced the named font with a substitute. I either had to find and copy the old fonts onto my new computer or replace the fonts with something else altogether.
  2. Look out for outdated information. One of my old courses made reference to an old email address and website of mine which no longer existed.
  3. Keep the published folder names the same. That way, all the links on the other websites and pages which are pointing to them will still work after you upload the new version. Fortunately for me, I kept my published folders all in the same place, so I’d highlight and copy the name of the old folder, delete that folder, then paste the old name into the new folder before uploading it to the site. I also like to delete the old version on the remote site before I upload the new version. I don’t like to leave it up to the FTP what should or shouldn’t get replaced completely.
  4. When reviewing your new published files, make sure you’re not looking at the old cached version. In Google Chrome, I’ve noticed that I actually have to delete my ENTIRE browsing history to prevent it from opening up an old version. There may be a better way, but I’ve tried to search for and delete all the files with the old name from my browser history and those older versions still would pop up. The only thing that seemed to work was to delete all the browsing history from the beginning of time! One way to know you’re looking at an older version is the browser will ask you if you want to continue from where you left off.
  5. Make sure any links in the lesson/interaction are current and functional. Being that you’re having to update and republish your elearning files, the fact that some old links may no longer be working shouldn’t be any surprise, but when you’re republishing 20 or more courses/interactions, to check for them at all may not have entered your mind.

I would be VERY interested to hear if you have any items to add to this list of things to look out for. If you do, please leave them in the comments section below.

Desk_Messy_Disorganized

Video Interaction with Closed Captions

This week’s Articulate E-learning Challenge was to create an interaction in Storyline using only shades of grey or in other words, black and white. As it turned out, I already had created a video for my band’s song “629” and it was about 90% in black and white. Being that the tune was based on a very interesting person from US history, I thought it would be fun to create a guessing game called Name that Scoundrel to determine who this person was, what he did for a living, and what organization he’s associated with.

Closed Captions
Recently, one of my clients needed CCs (or closed captions) for a piece of software training I was creating for them. And since the interaction for the e-learning challenge was going to be based on song lyrics, I thought it would be a great idea to use CCs so people could more easily make out the words.

There are a couple things you typically need to do to add CCs to a Storyline interaction.
1. You’ll probably want a button to turn them on and off. I didn’t need or want this in my
e-learning challenge, but it WAS a requirement for the software training piece I created for my client.
2. The words in the CCs need to appear as they are spoken. Because of this, you can’t just use the Notes tab in the Storyline Player.

NameThatScoundrelStillShot2

Turning CCs On and Off Using Layers
Tom Kuhlmann from Articulate shows how to add CCs you can turn on and off by putting them on a layer. Tom’s video also explains how to make the words appear in the CCs as they are spoken on the audio. After watching this video I realized that when you get to the next slide, they disappear. Fortunately, Brian Batt (also from Articulate) shows how to get CCs to continue from one slide to the next.

Turning CCs On and Off Without Using Layers
But what if you can’t or don’t want to use layers? Thankfully, Articulate Super Hero Steve Flowers thought of a way to add CCs without using layers.

NameThatScoundrelStillShot3

Conclusion
I know this blog has just focused on the CC aspect of this game. So please use the comments section below if you have any questions about how I created any of the other elements in Name that Scoundrel. And definitely, let me know what you think!